How to Give a Self-injection with Crohn’s Disease and IBD

How to Give a Self-injection with Crohn’s Disease and IBD
There are many medications for Crohn's disease and IBD. There are pills, IV infusions, self-injections, and shots and mechanisms for disease management. IV infusions are usually done in a hospital, while injections can be administered at a medical facility or at home. Whether given by yourself or with a nurse or family member, there are a few things to know about a subcutaneous injection. If you are beginning self-injections, you and your care team will receive training. Pay attention to what the nurses are saying and doing when you are being trained. Preparing for an injection I break the process into three parts: premedication, room temperature, and icing. Because I suffer side effects such as sinus pressure, nausea, and fatigue, I take premedications beforehand. I usually take Benadryl or a decongestant, anti-nausea medication, and Tylenol or migraine medication. I stay clear of NSAIDs as they can irritate ulcers and IBD symptoms. I discuss all preparations with my care team. An hour or two before my intended injection time, I bring my medication to room temperature. Most injections and supplies are kept cool, so bringing them to room temperature can help prevent feeling the coldness of the medication. Icing my injection site before I inject also helps me feel the injection less, but it does make the skin tougher.
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