Crohn’s Complications, Part Four: Sepsis

Crohn’s Complications, Part Four: Sepsis
Editor’s note: This is the fourth article in the “Crohn’s Complications” series by Mary Horsley. This series will focus on IBD-related complications beyond the symptoms. Read part one, part two and part three of the series. In my latest series, “Crohn’s Complications,” I write about the complications beyond the symptoms and focus on the more extreme medical emergencies that Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis can induce. As I mentioned in the “Beyond the Bathroom” series, and as many IBD patients can tell you, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are much more than just bathroom illnesses. These diseases come with true complications and worrisome problems. Remember, each patient is unique in his or her symptoms and disease, and what may happen for others may not necessarily be your path, too. Complications can happen with Crohn’s either through symptoms, sickness or surgeries, with no two patients suffering exactly the same way. With Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, now that we know when to visit the emergency room, a major concern for patients and doctors alike is the complication of sepsis. Sepsis, or septicemia, is general infections of the bloodstream that cause an immune response. Sepsis can be a very serious and life-threatening Crohn's complication. Infections that come from IV therapy, hospitalizations, and normal injuries or wounds can also lead to sepsis in any patient, Crohn's disease or not. Sepsis can start as a minor worry, but it can quickly lead to unpleasant complications and symptoms. It begins with fever and can end tragically with death. Sepsis is not to be ignored and can stem from any infectio
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