One in Six IBD Patients Meet Criteria for Substance Use Disorder (SUD), Study Suggests

One in Six IBD Patients Meet Criteria for Substance Use Disorder (SUD), Study Suggests
One in six patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experience a substance use disorder (SUD), or drug or alcohol addiction, a study suggests. In particular, people with IBD with a history of smoking, anxiety disorder, pain, and of the male gender are at a higher risk of SUD and should be targeted for drug and alcohol addiction screening in clinical practice, the researchers said. The study, titled “Prevalence and Risk Factors of Substance Use Disorder in Inflammatory Bowel Disease,” was published in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Psychiatric disorders are strongly associated with IBD. In fact, previous studies have shown that IBD patients are at a significantly higher risk of developing generalized anxiety disorder and depression compared with the general population. However, very few studies have investigated substance use disorder — including dependence on alcohol and drugs — among those with IBD. "Substance use disorder may complicate the management of IBD," the researchers said. "Comorbid SUD and chronic conditions are associated with higher rates of hospitalization than chronic conditions alone, and the presence of an SUD may interfere with adherence to treatment of the chronic condition and self-care behaviors." Now, a group of researchers from the University of Manitoba in Canada set out to evaluate the frequency and risk factors of substance use disorder in those with IBD. Overall, 247 people with IBD were recruited for the study. The participants underwent interviews and testing to identify a history of SUD, anxiety disorder, and major depressive disorder. The sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of the patients also were assessed. "Substance use disorders were defined by meeting diagnostic criteria for
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