Safety Concerns Prompt Prescription Changes Among Gastroenterologists

Safety Concerns Prompt Prescription Changes Among Gastroenterologists
A survey of gastroenterologists in the United States shows that data from the VARSITY clinical trial, as well as safety concerns about the experimental treatment Xeljanz, are affecting how some medications are prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The survey was conducted by the analytics company Spherix. In it, around 100 gastroenterologists were asked about their perceptions of brands competing for a share of the IBD market. The first notable finding from the survey has to do with results from VARSITY, a Phase 3 clinical trial (NCT02497469) that compared two IBD treatments: Entyvio (vedolizumab) and Humira (adalimumab). Entyvio works by preventing inflammatory cells from getting into the intestines; Humira is an anti-TNF therapy, meaning it works by blocking the inflammatory signaling molecule TNF (tumor necrosis factor). Humira is made by AbbVie, and Entyvio is made by Takeda, which sponsored the VARSITY trial. Results from the trial suggested that Entyvio was better than Humira at managing moderate to severe ulcerative colitis (UC), a type of IBD. According to a
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