Types of Rectal Bleeding with Crohn’s Disease and IBD

Types of Rectal Bleeding with Crohn’s Disease and IBD
Rectal bleeding with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is not uncommon, but it is never to be considered normal. Rectal bleeding can be the first sign of serious issues, with different types of bleeding indicative of certain problems with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). When Crohn's or ulcerative colitis patients notice bleeding, it is important to know where the blood came from. As mentioned in previous columns, Crohn's disease can affect a patient from head to toe, internally and externally, and inflammation can lead to an array of symptoms, including rectal bleeding. Rectal bleeding can be defined pretty simply: It's bleeding that comes out of your rectum. Bleeding with IBD, Crohn's disease, or ulcerative colitis usually signifies active disease and inflammation. Now, this bleeding does not necessarily have to come with a bowel movement, and it may not even be visible to the naked eye. Sometimes blood can go unnoticed. Often it can be bright red or dark black, depending on the source. To check for bleeding that is not visible, a fecal occult blood test is performed to search the stool for the hidden bleeding. Too much blood loss can lead to other, more severe problems such as anemia, shock, low blood pressure, fatigue, and often, hospitalization. In any case, no matter how much or insignificant the bleeding is, I always inform my doctors and gastroenterology care team. Red bleeding — Hematochezia Lower GI rectal bleeding and bleeding in the colon, rectum, and lower small intestine can lead to bright red blood. Crohn's inflammation can lead to ulcerations and internal bleeding. Fissures, abscesses, fistulas, and even hemorrhoids or persistent diarrhea can lead to red blood being noticed. Bright red blood may look like more than
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *