The Different Radiology Scans for Crohn’s Disease and IBD

The Different Radiology Scans for Crohn’s Disease and IBD
With Crohn's disease, patients sometimes have scope procedures like colonoscopies and endoscopies. Other times, they have to get other internal imaging and scans to locate disease progress or problems. After blood tests are ordered and stool samples are given, doctors may request radiology scans to see what's happening inside the digestive system. X-rays, MRIs, and CT scans are often necessary to help doctors see inflammation, disease activity, and complications. Since Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are internal diseases with inflammation in the digestive tract, this makes the visibility of inflammation hard to see without scans or scopes. Crohn's disease can happen anywhere in the digestive tract, top to bottom, so having many options for viewing inside the body helps with disease diagnosis and management. Some of these scans require drinking a solution beforehand, such as barium sulfate or Gastrografin (diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium), but that depends on the test. X-rays X-rays exams are common for IBD warriors. Sometimes a barium cocktail is given before an X-ray, but it's not always necessary. X-rays are noninvasive and easy, as a patient simply stays still for a few moments and follows any breathing or posture instructions given by the radiologist. CT scans  A CT scan, or CAT scan, stands for "computed axial tomography scan." Patients may be referred to the radiologist for one by their GI team, or have a scan during an emergency room visit. For CT scans, the patient lies down and is inserted into a tunnel-like machine until the scan finishes, while following any breathing instructions the radiologist gives: "Breathe in five seconds, hold your breath, breathe out." CT scans can view abscesses, fistulas, and bowel obstru
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *