The Family Curse

The Family Curse
crohn's corner One thing I hate about Crohn's is how it runs in families.  In my case, my aunt has it. She had no children, so I don't know if she would have given it to them, although I suppose the chances would have been high. Her sister is my mother. My mother doesn't have Crohn's, but I do. I am one of four children and the only one with it. I have two daughters, who are 19 and 22 — prime time for people to be diagnosed. Many days, I wonder if they will develop it, and fervently hope they won't.  My older daughter showed what could have been some symptoms last fall. I was freaking out when she told me about them, but I tried to be calm talking to her about it. She said if she winds up being diagnosed that she will just "deal with it." That's kind of how I felt when I was first diagnosed. I was 32, had two very young children, and frankly, was just happy to have an answer to the mysterious pain and struggles I had been going through that past year. I was given Asacol (mesalamine)— the drug of choice in those days — and told to take six a day. Easy enough, I thought.  What was the big deal about taking six pills a day?  I was just "dealing with it." As the years passed, and my symptoms got worse, lasted longer and caused all kinds of problems, I began realizing how naive I was to have thought I could "just deal with it." My daughters have big plans. My youngest is in her first year of college with dreams of becoming a social worker or lawyer or both, helping underprivileged kids.  My older daughter is a graduate
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *