What Parents Should Know About Their Children’s Stomachaches To Prevent Inflammatory Bowel Syndrome

What Parents Should Know About Their Children’s Stomachaches To Prevent Inflammatory Bowel Syndrome
Every child, at some point, gets a stomachache. Thankfully, they are usually brief and not something to be concerned about. But what actually happens in exceptional cases when the pain, constipation, or diarrhea do not go away? A pediatric gastroenterologist at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), Dr. Harry Cynamon, MD, recently discussed in a news release the elusive nature of irritable bowel syndrome in children, the importance of gut-brain connection, and which signs could point to more serious illness. How can parents know when a child's stomachache is really serious? In the majority of cases, they are not serious. But when the symptoms persist or do get worse, parents need to immediately take the child to the pediatrician so that the problem can be investigated. Which symptoms represent serious danger? There are issues that are red flags and need to be taken into account right away, such as throwing up blood or passing blood, losing weight, or not growing normally in a healthy way. If a children is not responding to a treatment or need more evaluation, parents should find a specialist. From infants to teenagers, Dr. Cynamon said that he commonly sees a variety of gastro-intestinal disorders and liver disease. He said that one of the most common problems he treats is stomach pain, which can be caused by different reasons, but usually is due to irritable bowel syndrome. What is irritable bowel syndrome? It is a condition characterized by chronic pain in the abdominal region along with either constipation or diarrhea. It can be very debilitating. Dr. Cynamon explained that when they do tests, the GI tract is normal and they see no inflammation or damage. The causes of the disease are not known, but they suspect it to be linked to
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