Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis May Be Caused By Genetic Factors, UCLA Study Suggests

Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis May Be Caused By Genetic Factors, UCLA Study Suggests
Early-onset of the severe inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis may be caused by several genetic factors, according to a recent study conducted at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The research performed with mice suggest possible new targets for prevention and treatment options to address the inflammation caused by the early onset of the rare disease that affects infants and young children and can lead to colon cancer and increased risk of liver damage. In collaboration with the Pusan National University in South Korea, scientists from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA designed a first-of-its-kind animal model that mimics early-onset ulcerative colitis and can be used to test investigational drugs for the treatment of the disease. The results of the collaboration between universities was published in the Gastroenterology journal. "We hope that identifying these key genetic factors and providing a unique research model will help lead to new approaches to treat early-onset ulcerative colitis, a devastating disease that currently has no cure," said the study's senior author and associate adjunct professor of medicine in the Division of Digestive Diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Sang Hoon Rhee. Based on other studies that revealed the importance of the anti-inflammatory protein interleukin 10, which refrigerates the inflammatory responses in the body, and is lacking in people Caption: Images under a microscope reveal a normal mouse colon (left) and a mouse colon with colitis (right). Note in the diseased colon the additional thickness in mass of the lining due to severe inflammation and cancer development. The images of the diseas
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