I Got 99 IBD Problems, but Prostate Cancer Ain’t One

I Got 99 IBD Problems, but Prostate Cancer Ain’t One
In 1999, the Prostate Health Council of the American Foundation for Urologic Disease recognized September as National Prostate Health Month, also known as National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. The American Cancer Society lists prostate cancer as the second most common type of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. According to the Urology Care Foundation, 1 in 9 American men will receive a prostate cancer diagnosis. Recently, researchers have studied the connection between prostate cancer and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). More than 3.1 million men are prostate cancer survivors. Being female, I’m not one of them. However, my father is. Prostate cancer symptoms, diagnosis A man usually doesn’t have symptoms in the early stages of prostate cancer. As it progresses, he may experience urgent, frequent, or painful urination. Painful ejaculation, blood in the urine or semen, and frequent urinary tract infections are other indicators. Doctors commonly detect prostate cancer through routine screenings. The American Cancer Society recommends men with an average risk get tested at age 50. African Americans and men with a father or brother who had prostate cancer before age 65 are high-risk and should begin testing at age 45. Higher-risk patients — those with multiple immediate family members with prostate cancer — should begin at age 40. A doctor screens for prostate cancer with a physical exam and a blood test. During a digital rectal exam (DRE), the provider inserts a finger into the rectum to feel the prostate for lumps and other abnormalities. The blood test measures the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) present in nanograms per milliliter. Most men with a PSA of 4 ng/ML or less won’t require further testin
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