Scientists Identify Biomarkers, Environmental Factors That May Lead to IBD Prevention

Scientists Identify Biomarkers, Environmental Factors That May Lead to IBD Prevention
Researchers at Mount Sinai have identified new protein biomarkers of Crohn’s disease, and environmental factors that may increase a person’s risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Together, these findings may help to develop new and more effective strategies for IBD prevention. “Early identification of individuals at high risk for disease development could allow for close monitoring and interventions to delay, attenuate, or even halt disease initiation,” Jean-Frederic Colombel, MD, professor of gastroenterology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, said in a press release. “This is highly relevant as we seek to predict and prevent IBD, which continues to sharply increase in numbers across the globe.” Colombel is also co-director of Mount Sinai’s Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center. The findings were reported in four different studies, all published simultaneously in Gastroenterology, a journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. In one of the studies, titled “Serum Biomarkers Identify Patients Who Will Develop Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Up to 5 y Before Diagnosis,” investigators reported the discovery of a panel of 51 protein biomarkers that can predict, with an accuracy of 76%, the development of Crohn’s disease five years prior to its definitive diagnosis. The study was based on serum samples from military personnel, collected from 1998 to 2013, as part of the U.S. Defense Medical Surveillance System. In total, the investigators analyzed samples from 200 patients with Crohn’s, 199 with ulcerative colitis, and 200 healthy individuals (controls). All patient samples were collected before a definitive diagnosis. “The study suggests that biological proce
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.