Prevalence of Mental Health Problems Rising Among Veterans with IBD, Study Reveals

Prevalence of Mental Health Problems Rising Among Veterans with IBD, Study Reveals
The prevalence of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is increasing in U.S. veterans with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a retrospective study. Meanwhile, the risk for IBD patients to develop these mental health conditions, particularly depression, appears to be decreasing. The study, titled "The Incidence and Prevalence of Anxiety, Depression, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in a National Cohort of US Veterans With Inflammatory Bowel Disease” was published in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. People with IBD are more likely to have mental health problems, especially anxiety and depression, compared to the general population. Previous research suggests that those mental issues actually may arise before patients develop symptoms of IBD and are associated with disease recurrence. However, evidence of trends in the incidence (the rate of new or newly diagnosed cases of the disease) and prevalence — the actual number of cases alive, with the disease either during a period of time (period prevalence), or at a particular date in time (point prevalence — of these health issues over time in patients living in the U.S. is limited. In this study, researchers at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and colleagues determined the temporal trends in the incidence and prevalence of anxiety, depression, and PTSD in veterans with IBD. Veterans are especially more likely to have PTSD, which also has been shown to be associated with chronic health problems. They collected data from 60,086 IBD patients (93.9% male) from 2000 to 2015 registered at the Veterans Health Administration, the largest integrated healthcare system in the U.S. The data was used to calculate the annual prevalence and incidenc
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