Feeding Infants the Probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis Led to Significantly Lower Intestinal Inflammation, Study Shows

Feeding Infants the Probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis Led to Significantly Lower Intestinal Inflammation, Study Shows
Intestinal inflammation was significantly lower in infants that were fed the bacteria B. infantis along with breast milk than in infants that were solely breastfed, a study shows. These findings suggest that adding the bacteria to a baby's diet may prevent bowel inflammation at this critical developmental phase. The study, titled “Colonization by B. infantis EVC001 modulates enteric inflammation in exclusively breastfed infants,” was published in the journal Pediatric Research. Research has shown that early gut dysbiosis (imbalance of bacterial species in the gut) in infants induces enteric (gut) inflammation, as exhibited by the increased expression of inflammatory proteins. This phenomenon has been linked to the development of several conditions later in life, namely inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Importantly, numerous reports in animal models and children have connected health outcomes to specific gut microbes and demonstrated how different microbial populations may influence immunity development. In fact, disruption of the early gut microbiome composition, exposure to antibiotics, and an abundance of Proteobacteria (a type of bacteria) in early life is linked to immune dysregulation later on in life. On the other hand, the abundance of Bifidobacterium infantis (Binfantis), has been shown to be negatively correlated with Proteobacteria but associated with positive health outcomes. While several publications have revealed the evolution of B. infantis as the predomina
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