Nurses Are the Heart and Soul of Medicine

Nurses Are the Heart and Soul of Medicine
A few weeks ago, I wrote about the most important nurse in my life, my mother. This week, I’d like to focus on a few other important nurses who have helped me along my Crohn’s journey. An Dube, Jennifer “Jen” Tiemann, and Heather Atkinson work in the infusion and endoscopy centers for Austin Gastroenterology. Except for the brief period when I was seeing my gastroenterologist once a month, I often see these three nurses more than I do my doctor when I go in for my Remicade (infliximab) infusions every eight weeks. Because of this, they were the ones who immediately knew something was terribly wrong with me a couple of weeks before I had my liver transplant. When I walked into the infusion center for my Remicade appointment, An and Jen noticed I was extremely jaundiced. They were so concerned that they didn’t want to start my infusion without first consulting my gastroenterologist. I had just seen my doctor two weeks earlier, so he told them to give me half of my prescribed dose because he didn’t want to risk the possibility of a flare. After that day, I didn't see my nurses for more than four months. I went out of my way to visit them following my first appointment with my gastroenterologist after my transplant. I not only wanted them to see how healthy I was again, but I also wanted to thank them for being fantastic nurses and taking care of me. An, Jen, and Heather wouldn’t have recognized how sick I was had they not de
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