How to Use Self-injecting Medications

How to Use Self-injecting Medications
There are many different medications for IBD and Crohn's disease, and many different ways to get each, including pill forms, IV infusions, and injections. Today, I'll discuss the injection methods. Recently, I changed from Entyvio (vedolizumab) IV infusions to one Stelara (ustekinumab) infusion for a loading dose. Now, I'm using Stelara self-injections. Many other medications, including Humira (adalimumab), require shots. When I did the Humira shots, I used quick-release pens — you don't really see the needle. Stelara injections have a completely different needle, inside a plastic injector. If you do not feel comfortable poking yourself, you can always ask your doctor's office to inject you instead. It's better to be comfortable rather than getting scared and injuring yourself or wasting the medication by accidentally emptying the needle or risking getting faint at the moment of injection. If you feel comfortable enough and your care team agrees, you can do self-injections at home, which is what I do. I've only self-injected in my stomach. I read in a few online forums that injecting the leg hurts worse, and I'd only ever done it in my stomach, so I never switched to my leg. Humira and Stelara manufacturers recommend allowing the medications to reach room temperature the day of injection. Before that, you keep them in a refrigerator, while never letting them freeze. Take the medication out only a few hours before you plan on injecting. (Photo by Mary Ho
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