IBD Patients with Iron Deficiency Treated Intravenously Had More Clinical, Cost Benefits, Study Finds

IBD Patients with Iron Deficiency Treated Intravenously Had More Clinical, Cost Benefits, Study Finds
Researchers found that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with iron deficiency (ID) or iron deficiency anemia (IDA) who were administered iron intravenously were hospitalized less frequently and had lower total healthcare costs compared to patients who took iron orally. The study, "Oral versus intravenous iron therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and iron deficiency with and without anemia in Germany – a real-world evidence analysis," was published in the journal ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research. Excluding the intestinal manifestations, IDA is the the most frequent complication of IBD. Although there are multiple causes of anemia in IBD, iron deficiency is one of the most prevalent, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Iron deficiency has an estimated prevalence of 36-90% in patients with IBD. The presence of IDA and ID is associated with an impaired quality of life and high healthcare costs. Patients are treated with either intravenous (IV) iron or oral iron therapy. Intravenous iron, however, has shown better clinical benefits compared to oral iron therapy. As only a few studies have conducted direct comparison between the two methods, German researchers set out to compare healthcare outcomes and costs of oral vs. intravenous iron treatment for IBD patients with iron deficiency or IDA. The study population included 29,331 patients with IBD, of whom 3,561 had iron deficiency or IDA. Of these, 589 patien
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