Corticosteroids, High-Dose Pulmicort Both Effective Therapies for Mild-to-Moderate Crohn’s

Corticosteroids, High-Dose Pulmicort Both Effective Therapies for Mild-to-Moderate Crohn’s
Treatment with corticosteroids and high-dose Pulmicort (budesonide) are both effective induction therapies for patients with mild-to-moderate Crohn’s disease, though high-dose Asacol (mesalamine) also offers an effective alternative with fewer side effects. Those are among the findings of a study, “Comparative Effectiveness of Mesalamine, Sulfasalazine, Corticosteroids, and Budesonide for the Induction of Remission in Crohn's Disease: A Bayesian Network Meta-analysis,” published in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Crohn's is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that may strike any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Symptoms often include abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever and weight loss. IBD affects between 26 and 199 per 100,000 Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Corticosteroids are commonly prescribed to treat mild to moderately active Crohn's, though patients with ileal and right-sided colonic disease are often prescribed Pulmicort (budesonide), an alternative corticosteroid with a reduced side-effect profile. Guidelines from the American College of Gastroenterology suggest that Asacol (mesalamine) is barely effective for the treatment of mild-to-moderate Crohn's. Many gastroenterologists continue to prescribe it for active Crohn's, though it has recently fallen out of favor. Gilaad G. Kaplan, MD, MPH, of Canada's University of Calgary
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *