IBD Disorders Found to Be Complex and Distinguished by Genetic Variations

IBD Disorders Found to Be Complex and Distinguished by Genetic Variations
New findings on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) suggested that genetic variation is critical for determining disease severity and could provide a more personalized approach for clinical management of IBD patients. The study, “Inherited determinants of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes: a genetic association study,” was published in the journal The Lancet. IBD affects approximately 1.6 million individuals in the U.S., including 80,000 children, according to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two main forms of IBD, affect 1 in every 200 people in developed countries. IBD is characterized by an exacerbated mucosal immune response from the intestine tissue in genetically susceptible individuals. Several genetic studies have identified 163 susceptibility loci for IBD, including NOD2 and HLA, common to both Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. Inflammation in Crohn's disease can occur in any region of the gastrointestinal tract, while ulcerative colitis normally occurs in the colon. The Montreal classification has been widely used to distinguish clinical subphenotypes in Crohn's disease by disease location, behavior, and age of onset, and in ulcerative colitis by disease extent and age of onset. Surgery and drugs that restore the immune system have been considered the most efficient treatments; however, IBD is considerably heterogeneous in disease course and in individual response to therapy. This is thought to be the
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