Certain Fatty Acids May Worsen Inflammation in Crohn’s Disease

Certain Fatty Acids May Worsen Inflammation in Crohn’s Disease
A number of previously published studies suggest intake of omega-3 fatty acids can help alleviate the inflammation that drives Crohn's disease. A recently published study by scientists at Duke School of Medicine caution, however, that while supplementing with fatty acids can be beneficial in this condition and in overall health, certain fatty acids may actually be detrimental to Crohn's disease. The study is available in the September 15 issue of the journal Genome Biology, and utilized cutting-edge research software that helps form associations between seemingly unrelated diseases and traits. The study is entitled "CPAG: software for leveraging pleiotropy in GWAS to reveal similarity between human traits links plasma fatty acids and intestinal inflammation". “Dietary therapies for Crohn’s disease should be examined more systematically, and this study provides a good first step,” said in a news release the study's senior author Dr. Dennis Ko, an assistant professor of molecular genetics and microbiology in the Duke School of Medicine. While food intake rich in fat content has been associated with Crohn's disease, this nutritional factor has never been linked to the disease from the point of view of shared genetics. According to research, there are sets of very particular genetic modifications that have been associated with higher concentrations of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstream. This new study was able to pinpoint these genetic overlaps between palmitoleic acid, a subtyp
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