Weightless Space Environment Could Give You A Bad Case Of Diarrhea (Or Worse)

Weightless Space Environment Could Give You A Bad Case Of Diarrhea (Or Worse)
Research reported in the August 2015 issue of The Federation Of American Societies For Experimental Biology (FASEB) Journal suggests that in weightless environments, mouse intestine microbiomes undergo changes in the balance of bacteria and the function of immune cells, rendering the gut more prone to inflammation. The paper, "Simulated microgravity disrupts intestinal homeostasis and increases colitis susceptibility,"  was coauthored by Pingping Li, Junxiu Shi, Peng Zhang, Ke Wang, Jinglong Li, Hongju Liu, Yu Zhou, Xi Xu, Jie Hao, Xiuyuan Sun, Xuewen Pang, Yan Li, Hounan Wu, Xiaoping Chen, and Qing Ge, variously of the Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, Department of Immunology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, and Peking University Medical and Health Analytical Center, Peking University Health Sciences Center, Beijing, China; State Key Laboratory of Space Medicine Fundamentals and Application, Chinese Astronaut Research and Training Center, Beijing, China; and College of Life Sciences and Key Laboratory of Modern Teaching Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian, China The investigators noted that immune systems can be altered by spaceflight in many aspects, but microgravity-related mucosal immune changes and its clinical significance have not been well studied. The purpose of their study was to investigate whether simulated microgravity influences the intestinal homeostasis and increases susceptibility to colon inflammation. The hindlimb unloading (HU) mouse model was used to simulate the microgravity condition. The researchers used
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