New Set Of Guidelines Released, Critiqued For Non-Hospitalized Patients With Ulcerative Colitis

New Set Of Guidelines Released, Critiqued For Non-Hospitalized Patients With Ulcerative Colitis
A group of Canadian experts recently published a set of guidelines aimed at improving treatment of Ulcerative Colitis (UC) for patients who are not hospitalized and are affected by mild to severe forms of the condition. The guidelines were developed in order to help physicians put the latest therapeutic options to best use in a clinical setting. The consensus guidelines were released by The Toronto Ulcerative Colitis Consensus Group (published in Gastroenterology, April 28th, 2015), as a result of a thorough literature review completed in June 2014. After a modified Delphi discussion, 34 clauses focusing on current therapeutic options for UC, including administration of 5-aminosalicylate, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, anti-tumor necrosis factor agents and other therapies (Entyvio [vedolizumab, Takeda Pharmaceuticals], fecal microbiota transplantation and probiotics) was published. A systematic therapeutic regime for the medical management of UC was also released by the group, with its ultimate goal being “complete remission, including both symptomatic and endoscopic remission, with timely assessments of response and remission being a key factor in achieving this goal.” The researchers state that continued therapy with the same agents used from the beginning of treatment in UC patients, with the exception of corticosteroids, should be sufficient in maintaining remission, according to their guidelines. Commenting on this, the authors noted, “Previous Canadian recommendations have addressed severe UC in the hospitalized patient, and these guidelines present recommendations for the non-hospitalized patient with mi
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