Researchers Offer Groundbreaking Insights into IBD Genetics

Researchers Offer Groundbreaking Insights into IBD Genetics
A recent review on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) entitled “Advances in IBD Genetics” was published in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology by Johan Van Limbergen, M.D., FRCPCH, Ph.D., assistant professor and clinician scientist in the Department of Pediatrics at Dalhousie University and the Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition at IWK Health Centre in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, and colleagues. In this review, the authors emphasized how genetic association studies have contributed to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD by reviewing the most recent research data on crucial genetic markers and cellular pathways implicated in innate immunity, autophagy, lymphocyte differentiation, and chemotaxis processes, which may be promising candidates for patient management and therapeutic strategies. The authors highlight the "Immunochip Project,” which is the most recent attempt in finding genetic factors involved in the development of IBD. This project is intended to fine-map genetic elements of the 99 recognized IBD susceptibility loci -- a genetic region that gives susceptibility or predisposition to a certain disease -- which will provide new information about common genetic factors between IBD and other autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis and type 1 diabetes. Moreover, family-based studies on ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) have provided crucial findings that helped on large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on the genetic patterns of IBD and assessing how much of the susceptibility to IBD is attributable to genetics. Though, the authors stated that the data from these family studies have been questioned. Through GWAS and the" Immunoc
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