Oral Bacteria Might Aggravate IBD, New Study Suggests

Oral Bacteria Might Aggravate IBD, New Study Suggests
Oral BacteriaA certain type of bacteria in the mouth could be associated with the aggravation of inflammatory bowel disease, a study published in the Oral Diseases journal suggests. Acknowledging that streptococcus mutans can aggravate colitis, an inflammation of the colon, in mice, a team of researchers from the Osaka University wanted to evaluate the virulence of colitis using type strains as well as blood isolates of several oral streptococcal species. Streptococcus mutans is a bacteria that inhabits the human oral cavity and produces plaque and acids, breaking down tooth enamel and causing dental caries. Researchers investigated the susceptibility of blood isolates of several oral streptococci to phagocytosis, as well as adhesion to and invasion of hepatic cells and interferon-γ secretion. They used a mouse model of dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis, in order to evaluate bacterial aggravation of colitis. In addition, team administrated interferon-γ antibody to mice with prominent aggravation of colitis. Results showed that streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556 was a possible virulent strain among type strains of several oral streptococci, and that analysis of blood isolates of S. sanguinis TW289 revealed a potential virulent strain. Furthermore, intravenous administration of ATCC 10556 and TW289 caused prominent aggravation of dextran sodium s
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