Exposure to Livestock Farms Alone Doesn’t Increase Risk of IBD, Dutch Study Suggests

Exposure to Livestock Farms Alone Doesn’t Increase Risk of IBD, Dutch Study Suggests
Researchers in the Netherlands found that exposure to livestock farms alone carries little risk for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Their findings suggest that residents in livestock-dense areas may be protected from developing IBD. Poultry farms, however, are a potential risk for infection, but only for neighboring residents. The study, “Healthcare utilization prior to the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases and the influence of livestock exposure: A longitudinal case-control study,” was published in the journal Plos One. After an increased prevalence of IBD was observed in residents of an area rich in farms and livestock, several studies were conducted that seemed to support the hypothesis that residents in livestock-dense areas may be more prone to IBD. In the new study, researchers aimed to investigate whether exposure to livestock contributed to the development of these diseases, along with looking at IBD patients' visits to a doctor and prescriptions filled before their diagnosis. Investigators used electronic health records from 2006–2013 of general practitioners in the Netherlands. The study consisted of patients with a new diagnosis of IBD who lived in areas with a high density of livestock (141 patients) and low livestock density (109 patients). Controls in the study included people with low back pain (10,469 patients). Researchers analyzed the link between disease and drug prescriptions in the reporting year and in the three years before an IBD diagnosis, as well as the participants’ residential proximity to livestock. Areas
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *