Rare Microscopic Colitis in IBD Associated With More Active Inflammation, Study Reports

Rare Microscopic Colitis in IBD Associated With More Active Inflammation, Study Reports
Lymphocytic colitis (LC) and collagenous colitis (CC) occur rarely in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but are linked with more active inflammation, a study reports. The findings highlight the need to identify LC/CC in patients so that they can receive appropriate healthcare management. The study, “Clinicopathological significance of lymphocytic colitis/collagenous colitis in inflammatory bowel disease,” was published in the journal Human Pathology. LC and CC are two types of IBD characterized by inflammation of the colon, the last portion of the bowel that ends at the anus. LC/CC are commonly called microscopic colitis since their diagnosis requires examination of tissue under a microscope. Patients with these conditions often have chronic watery diarrhea, with normal or almost normal colonoscopy, and women between 60 and 70 years of age are the more commonly affected. In the study, researchers set out to characterize the clinical features of patients with microscopic colitis before or after the onset of IBD. The team also evaluated the impact of LC/CC on IBD. "Although there are some case reports that have described patients with LC/CC evolving into [ulcerative colitis/Crohn's disease] later in life or vice versa, the correlation between LC/CC and IBD has not been well defined," the team wrote. Using the surgical pathology files at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minnesota, the researchers identified 27 patients diagnosed with one of the two major forms of IBD — ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease — who developed microscopic colitis. Patients were separated into two categories: those who developed LC/CC before IBD and those who developed it after. In total, 10 patients with initial diagnoses of LC (two patients)/CC (eight p
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