In the Pit of My Stomach: Depression and Anxiety With IBD

In the Pit of My Stomach: Depression and Anxiety With IBD
Editor’s note: Please be advised that the topic of suicide is addressed in this column. Resources for help are listed at the end of the column. I was born on July 19, the Cancer-Leo cusp. I have the typical Cancer, the Crab, personality. I’m intuitive, empathetic, sensitive, and emotional, which I hide beneath a hardened exterior. At the same time, my Leonine ambition drives me to be active — physically and mentally. I’m highly competitive and only satisfied when I exceed expectations. When these two aspects of my personality are harmonious, I can achieve whatever I set out to do. However, with unbalanced temperaments, I become an emotional wreck. Idleness makes me feel worthless. Failure causes despair. If I allow my anxiety to get the best of me, I risk falling into a deep depression. When feeling blue turns black Sadness is a temporary reaction to an upsetting or painful event. Persisting sadness can turn into depression, a mental illness that can range from mild to severe. Symptoms include feelings of grief or worthlessness, insomnia or oversleeping, fatigue, loss of appetite or binge eating, difficulty concentrating or indecisiveness, and slowed movements or agitation. Someone with depression may also lose interest in favorite pastimes, experience psychosomatic aches and pains, and have suicidal tendencies. The American Psychiatric Association states that one in six people experience depression at one point in their lives. When symptoms last two weeks or more and affect the person’s relationships, “feeling depressed” becomes a major depressive disorder that can last for a few weeks to several years. Eeyore, my spirit animal My depression episodes have been few and far between. When I was 11, moving for the fifth time overwhelmed my prepub
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