When Good Bodies Attack Themselves

When Good Bodies Attack Themselves
Recently, the satirical news site The Onion published an article told from the viewpoint of a quarantined man’s immune system. Fighting the same germs every day had become tedious, so the “immune system had begun attacking normal, healthy tissue just to break the monotony.” Truth is stranger than fiction. After being locked inside for six weeks, my immune system got a taste of the outside world when I had my Remicade (infliximab) infusion and quarterly bloodwork in mid-April. Having overcome the Crohn’s flare that began shortly after I went into self-isolation, my excitement-starved immune system began attacking my body. I’ve spent the past month and a half leaving the house every week to appease it. The adventure begins My quarterly bloodwork was unremarkable. All my numbers were stable and around the normal range. However, my tacrolimus level, which suppresses my immune system, was a little low. I knew if my transplant nurse Cassie called, she would increase my dosage. When she called, I asked if diarrhea could affect the tacrolimus level. She told me to hold off on increasing my dose until she spoke to my doctor. Cassie never called back, but I decided to get labs redone two weeks later. I no longer had diarrhea, and I wanted to see if my numbers improved. In the interim, I had a telehealth appointment with my gastroenterologist’s physician assistant Jessica. I was unable to schedule the FibroScan ordered by my hepatologist to check for fatty liver disease because the center was closed. Jessica suggested I start drinking coffee because the antioxidants would combat the effects of the disease. I left a message with Cassie about the FibroScan and told her to keep an eye out for lab results. Making matters worse by trying to do good The second s
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