Pounds Off the Scale Lift a Weight Off My Shoulders

Pounds Off the Scale Lift a Weight Off My Shoulders
Last week, I had my semiannual appointment with my transplant hepatologist. The nurse had just finished recording my weight when my doctor walked by after finishing up with another patient. When she saw me, she joked that I was one patient she didn’t have to worry about being overweight. I chuckled and told her I had gained weight since I saw her in September. Although my body mass index is still in the normal range, I'm only a pound or two away from being overweight. I was hoping the extra weight gain was muscle from exercising harder because my thighs have become noticeably more muscular. Never mind that I've developed a sweet tooth and can’t go a day without having dessert. Despite exercising four days a week and walking 12,000 or more steps a day, the extra cookies and cake slices I've been eating add up to more calories than I'm expending. I proposed my muscle-weighs-more-than-fat theory to my doctor after she reviewed my chart and commented on my weight. She confirmed that the weight gain was from my not-so-healthy diet. She also informed me that there was a correlation between my weight gain and rising liver enzymes. Fearing that I might be at risk for developing fatty liver, she suggested I speak to my gastroenterologist about getting a FibroScan, a noninvasive procedure to examine my liver, during my next appointment with him. What is fatty liver? Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is caused by an accumulation of fat in liver cells. If uncontrolled, NAFLD can develop into nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. This more aggressive form of NAFLD can cause liver inflammation that can lead to cirrhosis or scarring of the liver. The fourth and final stage of cirrhosis is liver failure, which is why my hepatologist scolded me for my 10-pound weight
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