Osteoporosis Twice as High in IBD Patients, Danish Study Finds

Osteoporosis Twice as High in IBD Patients, Danish Study Finds
The risk of osteoporosis is twice as high in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) as in the general population, a Danish study found. The study, “Incidence, risk factors and evaluation of osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease - a Danish population-based inception cohort with 10 years of follow-up,” was published in the Journal of Crohn's and Colitis. Osteoporosis — a condition that weakens bones, making them more porous, fragile, and prone to fractures —is a common complication among IBD patients. The condition is marked by a progressive reduction in bone mineral density (BMD), or bone density loss, which develops silently and progressively and is often only diagnosed when a fall or sudden impact causes a bone fracture. The use of corticosteroids, chronic inflammation, vitamin D deficiency caused by food malabsorption, and low body mass index (BMI) are some of the factors thought to contribute to osteoporosis in IBD patients. Corticosteroids tend to lessen the body’s ability to absorb calcium and to speed bone destruction. The more and the longer a person takes these medications, the greater the risk of developing osteoporosis. Yet few studies have addressed the prevalence of osteoporosis among those with IBD, or investigated possible screening practices. There are no specific recommendations for how frequently IBD patients should be screened for bone loss (by dual-energy X-ray absorption, also known as DXA or DEXA scans), and current European guidelines do not address precautions for specific risk factors in these patients. Researchers at Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre in Denmark conducted a population-based study with a decade of follow-up to investigate the frequency of osteoporosis and its scre
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