Study Identifies Risk Factors for the Poor Sleep Experienced by Two-thirds of IBD Patients

Study Identifies Risk Factors for the Poor Sleep Experienced by Two-thirds of IBD Patients
Researchers have identified risk factors — greater disability, lower quality of life, and non-intestinal symptoms — for the poor sleep experienced by two-thirds of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Their study, "Sleep disturbance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: prevalence and risk factors – A cross-sectional study," was published in the journal Scientific Reports. IBD can significantly affect the quality of life of patients, who experience severe fatigue and potential mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Poor sleep quality has been associated with worse symptoms, lower work productivity, and more frequent relapses. As such, researchers at the University Hospital of Padua, in Italy, sought out to investigate sleep quality and its effects on a large cohort of IBD patients. They evaluated a total of 166 IBD patients, including 87 with Crohn’s disease and 79 with ulcerative colitis, the two main forms of IBD. The patients were 44.39 years old on average, and nearly half (82 patients) were older than 45. Among the participants, 134 patients were considered to be in remission, 45 had at least one extra-intestinal manifestation (EIM), and 32 patients were classified with active disease. During the study, 98 patients were taking biologicals — including infliximab (sold as Remicade by Janssen Pharmaceutical, as well as other brand names), AbbVie’s Humira (adalimumab), Takeda’s Entyvio or Janssen’s Simponi (golimumab) — and 29 were receiving immunosuppressive therapy (azathioprine/AZA or methotrexate). Sleeping problems were evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep quality index (PSQI), a self-reported questionnaire that evaluates 19 items related to sleep quality over one-month intervals. Scoring ranges from zero to 2
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