Education Strategies May Improve IBD Patients’ School Attendance, UK Study Suggests

Education Strategies May Improve IBD Patients’ School Attendance, UK Study Suggests
Many more children and young people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) miss school or college classes compared with their IBD-free peers, an English study shows. The study found patients' main concerns are a limited access to toilets, a lack of understanding of IBD from teachers, and a generalized feeling of being unwell. Titled “Children and young people with inflammatory bowel disease attend less school than their healthy peers,” the study was published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. Inflammatory bowel disease and its treatment demands can affect patients’ quality of life, including work, social activities, and schooling. Indeed, research indicates that children and adolescents with IBD miss class time more often than their healthy peers. "Some data suggest that health-related quality of life and education attainment are not always impaired in children with IBD if coping and support strategies are effective," the investigators said. Therefore, determining IBD’s impact on school or college attendance is essential to provide targeted support to young patients, their families, and schools. Now, researchers at the Southampton Children’s Hospital in the United Kingdom examined the extent to which IBD affects academic attendance and sought to determine the contributing factors for absences. In the U.K., all children's school attendance is noted as a percentage on a yearly academic report, enabling accurate and reliable collection of such data for analysis purposes. Investigators created a survey for children with these diseases to determine the school or college attendance rates in the last year, the reasons for absence related to IBD, facilitators or barriers to academic attendance, and current treatments. “All eligible p
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