Finding a Work-Life Balance with IBD

Finding a Work-Life Balance with IBD
This time last year, I left my job as a university lecturer that I'd held for almost a decade. After my liver transplant, I transitioned from full-time work to a part-time contract, so I already had one foot out the door. I had a couple of freelance clients lined up to supplement my half-time teaching salary, so when I submitted my letter of separation, I still had some income coming in. When I quit my teaching job, I vowed that I would never work full time unless my financial situation became dire. I owed it to my health — physically and emotionally — to lead a less stressful existence and enjoy life. Alas, I didn’t even make it a year before the workaholic in me reared her head. Also, I’m pragmatic. I hope for the best but plan for the worst. My husband, Patrick, and I are far from bankruptcy. But the lack of a steady paycheck on my part was causing some concern. And, as I’ve mentioned time and again, stress is my No. 1 IBD trigger. I announced in a recent column that I accepted a full-time position as a digital content editor (DCE). I suppose that as an independent contractor, I’m not legally bound to work a full 40-hour week. But I’m overly ambitious and a glutton for punishment, so I set lofty goals for myself all of the time. As I write this, I’m finishing up my first 40-hour workweek as a DCE. I probably worked closer to 50 hours when you add in meeting my deadlines for this column and another client. I’m struggling to balance an overly full workload with the life of leisure I was blessed with the past year. But I refuse to give up one for the other. I battled through the first week. I've realized that my need to be perfect and thorough has led to the familiar sour stomach and intestinal rumblings. My daily deadlines are doable, b
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