Risk of Certain Pregnancy Complications Higher Among Women With IBD, Study Suggests

Risk of Certain Pregnancy Complications Higher Among Women With IBD, Study Suggests
Certain pregnancy complications — cesarean-section delivery, gestational diabetes, and preterm prelabour rupture of membranes — are more common among women diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease than in the general population, according to a large study. However, these women did not have a higher incidence of placenta-related disorders, including preeclampsia, placental abruption, and placenta previa. The study, “Systematic review with meta-analysis: risk of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease,” was published in the journal Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a designation that includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), affects women in their fertile years. Symptoms usually appear from age 15 to 30, and about half of the patients are diagnosed before reaching 35. Estimates show that 25% of patients become pregnant after getting an IBD diagnosis. Some studies have reported higher rates of cesarean section (C-section), gestational diabetes, and placenta-related disorders in women diagnosed with IBD. However, these findings are from studies with relatively small numbers of patients. In the new study, researchers in Canada conducted a large systematic review based on previously published data to investigate whether women with IBD are at risk for pregnancy complications. In total, they selected 53 studies that included 7,917 pregnancies from women with IBD and 3,253 from healthy women (controls). The analysis showed that C-sections were more common among pregnant women with IBD — incidence of 32.5% — than in the general population, which had an incidence of 21%. C-sections were seen in 21.4% of women with UC and 28.9% with CD. The risk of C-section
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