Prevalence of Ulcerative Colitis in the US Remains Stable at 1%, Survey Data Show

Prevalence of Ulcerative Colitis in the US Remains Stable at 1%, Survey Data Show
The prevalence of ulcerative colitis remained stable in the United States from 1976 to 2010, affecting 1% of the population, according to a survey analysis. The study also found that about a quarter of patients with inflammatory bowel disease experienced a common form of lower back pain called chronic axial pain, and had more arthritis diagnoses. The findings were presented in a poster, titled “The US Prevalence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Associated Axial Pain: Data from the National Healthy & Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES),” at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, held in Atlanta. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can experience axial and inflammatory back pain. They also can exhibit extra-intestinal manifestations, such as spondyloarthritis, a type of arthritis involving the spine and, in some cases, the arm and leg joints. In this study, researchers compared the rate of axial pain between IBD patients and people without the disease (controls). They used data from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. Specifically, they analyzed data from surveys conducted from 2009 to 2010 (NHANES 2009–10) and 1976 to 1980 (NHANES II). The surveys asked participants about their clinical history and diagnosis of either ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (this was assessed only in the NHANES 2009–10 survey), the two main forms of IBD; gastrointestinal symptoms; medical care; and additional conditions, including axial pain and diagnosed arthritis. NHANES 2009–10 also had questions about pain quality to estimate the prevalence of inflammatory back pain. The analy
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