Time and Proper Care Heal All Wounds

Time and Proper Care Heal All Wounds
I never think much about my scars. I wear them like badges of honor earned through the rites of passage of my health journey. But the Mercedes incision across my midsection from my liver transplant has been bothering me. Over the past few weeks, I’ve found myself both consciously scratching and absentmindedly rubbing my fingers along the slightly raised scar to relieve the itchiness. I’ve also been feeling a slight tugging sensation along the right side of the scar when I exercise my abdominal muscles. I wouldn’t say I’m experiencing pain. The itchiness is more of an annoyance and the pulling sensation causes some mild discomfort when doing pushups. I chalk this up to regaining the feeling in my abdomen as the nerves continue to regenerate from my surgery two years ago. But I wonder if I could have taken better care of my incision and other wounds to lessen the physical effects and aesthetic of my scars. Most inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients won’t have the same type of scar that I have. However, the probability of caring for a surgical wound is high. The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America estimates that 23 percent to 45 percent of ulcerative colitis patients and up to 75 percent of Crohn’s patients will eventually require surgery. Scarring also may occur because of
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.