PD-L2 a Potential Target to Prevent Inflammation in Crohn’s Disease, Study Reveals

PD-L2 a Potential Target to Prevent Inflammation in Crohn’s Disease, Study Reveals
Inhibition of the signals triggered by a molecule called PD-L2 may prevent activation of autoimmunity in the gut and the progression of Crohn’s disease, a preliminary study suggests. “This study is another important step in our understanding of Crohn’s disease and opens up a new area to investigate,” Graham Radford-Smith, who is a deputy director at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital department of gastroenterology and co-author of the study, said in a press release. “If we can understand why inflammation occurs in Crohn’s patients, then we can work out strategies to treat, and possibly in the future, prevent the disease.” The study, “Crohn's disease is facilitated by a disturbance of programmed death‐1 ligand 2 on blood dendritic cells,” was published in the journal Clinical & Translational Immunology. Crohn’s disease is a common form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is triggered by the over-activation of the immune cells in the small intestines and colon. Inhibition of pro-inflammatory signaling molecules has been shown to help manage Crohn’s symptoms. However, available therapies are only effective in 20–50% of patients, highlighting the continuing need for better understanding of the disease and new therapeutic strategies. Prior studies have suggested that the interaction between dendritic cells and reactive T-c
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