Human Microbiome Project Reveals Causes of Disrupted Gut in IBD Patients

Human Microbiome Project Reveals Causes of Disrupted Gut in IBD Patients
Differences in molecular events in the gut contribute to the disrupted microbiome and flare-ups in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, according to a study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Broad Institute at MIT and Harvard. “Our results from this study pave the way for early detection of upcoming flares in disease activity—which can then be aggressively treated — or potentially for new biochemical therapeutic opportunities to encourage complete remission of IBD,” Curtis Huttenhower, PhD,  senior author of the study and professor at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and associate member at the Broad Institute, said in a press release. The study, “Multi-omics of the gut microbial ecosystem in inflammatory bowel diseases,” was published in the journal Nature. The study was part of the second phase of the National Institute of Health’s Human Microbiome Project initiative, whose goal is to uncover the molecular mechanisms that govern the role gut microbes play, especially in conditions like IBD. “The Human Microbiome Project overall has
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.