Study Links Depression to Increased IBD Activity, Faulty Emotional Recognition

Study Links Depression to Increased IBD Activity, Faulty Emotional Recognition
Depression is linked to increased disease activity and fewer positive emotional recognition biases in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a study suggests. The study, "Factors associated with depression in people with inflammatory bowel disease: The relationship between active disease and biases in neurocognitive processing," was published in the journal Neurogastroenterology & Motility. Depression is common in people with IBD, but it's not clear what factors actually cause or make a person more likely to develop depression. Specifically, depression affects 14% to 27 % of people with IBD, a prevalence two to three times higher than that of the general population. To address this question, researchers recruited 120 people with IBD (68 with Crohn's disease, 49 with ulcerative colitis and three with unclassified IBD). The participants were assessed with a number of tests, such as the Emotional Recognition Task (ERT), which determines one's ability to recognize basic emotions (happy, sad, angry, and fearful) from images of people's eyes. Researchers also collected data on disease state, duration and type, as well as relevant demographic information. In the cohort, 26 people (22%) had depression. They were more likely to be female and to have active disease. They also tended to have poor social support structures. People in the cohort who had depression were also more likely to be taking corticosteroids, but whether a person was taking TNF-alpha inhibitors was not associated with depression. Additionally, participants with depression tended to have fewer positive emotional recognition biases — they weren't as good at correctly identifying other people's emotions, for example, thinking a surprised face looks angry. Interestingly, in stati
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.