Costs of Care for Crohn’s, UC, Have Increased Over Last Five Years in US, Study Says

Costs of Care for Crohn’s, UC, Have Increased Over Last Five Years in US, Study Says
The costs of care for people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) living in the U.S. have steadily increased over the last five years, primarily due to the high price tag for IBD therapies, frequent emergency department visits, and treatments for other related disorders, the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation found. Patients with IBD had healthcare costs three times higher than those without the disease, the study found. The study, "The Cost of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Initiative From the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation," was published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and presented at a poster session during the Digestive Disease Week conference, held recently in San Diego. "To truly understand the financial impact of IBD, we commissioned a study to look at the drivers of cost of care for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis," Michael Osso, president and CEO of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation, said in a press release. "The results of this study confirm what we suspected — having IBD places an enormous financial burden on patients and their families. We must work together as a community to tackle the costs to ensure that patients have access to the treatments they need, when they need it," Osso said.  In addition to characterizing the drivers of healthcare costs for those with IBD, the study also focused on assessing the costs of care among newly diagnosed patients, and describing the direct and indirect care costs people with the disease face every year. Researchers looked at claims data that had been stored at the Optum Research Database from 2007 to 2016. That data contained information about both commercially insured and Medicare Advantage-insured patients living in the U.S. The mean costs paid per member per year (PMPY) — ref
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