IBD Mortality Rates Down in Recent Years, but Still Higher Than General Population, Study Reports

IBD Mortality Rates Down in Recent Years, but Still Higher Than General Population, Study Reports
Although mortality rates associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have declined substantially over recent years, patients diagnosed with IBD as adults still have a higher risk of death than the general population, a study has found. The study, "Mortality in adult-onset and elderly-onset IBD: a nationwide register-based cohort study 1964–2014," was published in the journal Gut. IBD is made up a group of autoimmune disorders, including Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), and IBD-unclassified (IBD-U), that cause inflammation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. As a result, patients experience bouts of abdominal pain and diarrhea, often accompanied by weight loss and rectal bleeding, which can pose a significant burden on their overall quality of life. Although IBD has been linked to a higher risk of death, few studies have assessed the mortality risk among patients diagnosed with different forms of the disease. "Indeed, and somewhat disturbingly in light of the changes in the treatment paradigm for IBD during the last 20 years, there are only little data on mortality in patients diagnosed with either UC or CD after 2000. Furthermore, there are no studies on mortality in patients with IBD-U and only inconsistent data regarding cardiovascular and several other causes of death in IBD," the in
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