Pseudopolyps Do Not Predict Colorectal Cancer Risk in IBD Patients, 20-year Retrospective Study Shows

Pseudopolyps Do Not Predict Colorectal Cancer Risk in IBD Patients, 20-year Retrospective Study Shows
Pseudopolyps — large protrusions of the intestinal layer formed in the regenerative and healing phases of damaged tissue — are not predictors of risk for developing colorectal cancer among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), a 20-year retrospective study reports.  The study “No Association Between Pseudopolyps and Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases” was published in the journal Gastroenterology. Patients with IBD are at an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer, especially those positive for post-inflammatory polyps (also called pseudopolyps), according to previous research. These studies showed that post-inflammatory polyps were found in 20 to 45 percent of IBD patients and that their presence increased the risk of developing colorectal cancer by 1.9 to 2.5 times. Current European guidelines propose that patients with several risk factors, including post-inflammatory polyps, should be monitored with frequent colonoscopies. However, a large retrospective study on patients with ulcerative colitis, who were being monitored for early signs of colorectal cancer, reported no increased risk for patients with post-inflammatory polyps to develop the disease or for the polyps' progression into more advanced stages. Further studies are warranted to know whether these polyps can act as independent predictors of colorectal cancer. Therefore, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, along with colleagues
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