Gut Microbe-Derived Molecule UroA and Its Artificial Version Show Promise for IBD

Gut Microbe-Derived Molecule UroA and Its Artificial Version Show Promise for IBD
Urolithin A (UroA), a molecule produced by gut microbes, and its made-in-the-lab version, UAS03, alleviated and prevented symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a cell and animal study. In the study, "Enhancement of the gut barrier integrity by a microbial metabolite through the Nrf2 pathway," published in Nature Communications, researchers used IBD cell lines and a mouse model for ulcerative colitis to assess the compounds' beneficial effects. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as one of its two main forms, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, affects millions of people worldwide. Currently there is no cure, and long-term treatments are often inefficient. IBD patients have chronic inflammation and alterations in the gut barrier — a layer of cells that protects the gut from external agents and is formed by proteins that create seals, called cell junctions, between each other. Some IBD treatments focus on reducing the inflammatory response, but there are no treatments capable of improving gut permeability. Imbalances in the gut microbiota can lead to inflammation and reduced production of cell junction proteins, leading to IBD. Moreover, some substances (called metabolites) produced by the microbiota are related to disease development. A diet rich in pomegranates and berries has been linked to health benef
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