What to Expect When Getting a Central Line or Implanted Port

What to Expect When Getting a Central Line or Implanted Port
lisa burks Continuing on from my last column on what to expect when having different venous access procedures, I’ll share information about central catheters and implanted ports.

Central catheters

Central catheters are an efficient means of venous access for people who need stronger medications for 29 days or less. Typically, these are used in hospitals for procedures and hospital stays. Interventional radiologists or anesthesiologists usually put these in. I have had four central lines. Firstly, placing a central line needs to be done in a very sterile environment. Most often, a doctor prefers to give medications to relax or sedate the patient, but the procedure can be done without them. In my experience, it hasn't been that bad. Like the procedure for peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines, a patient lies on a table to be draped in a sterile field. The doctor uses a special scanner to find the vein to place the catheter. Usually, central lines are placed in the jugular vein in the neck, but they also can be placed in the upper chest's 
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