Viruses That Infect Gut Bacteria May Play Role in IBD, Mouse Study Suggests

Viruses That Infect Gut Bacteria May Play Role in IBD, Mouse Study Suggests
Populations of bacteria-infecting viruses, called bacteriophages, were found to be altered in the intestines of a mouse model of colitis, indicating that these viruses may be involved in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a study reports. Researchers suggest that results from this study could be used to develop a therapy for colitis, a type of IBD. Additionally, bacteriophages, also known simply as phages, could be used as markers to predict whether someone is at risk of developing colitis. "We could promote the growth of good bacteria — a kind of phage therapy," Breck Duerkop, PhD, assistant professor of immunology and microbiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and first author of the study, said in a press release. "We could perhaps use phages as markers to identify someone predisposed to developing these diseases. While there is clearly more research to do, the potential is very exciting." The study, “Murine colitis reveals a disease-associated bacteriophage community,” was published in Nature Microbiology. IBD patients are known to have an imbalance in their gut microbiome, which is comprised of bacteria and other microorganisms. The dysregulation of intestinal microbial communities is associated with increased inflammation. Most studies that have examined the effect of gut microbiota on IBD ha
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