Variation in Single Gene May Determine Response to Humira in IBD Patients, Study Reports

Variation in Single Gene May Determine Response to Humira in IBD Patients, Study Reports
A single variation in the DNA sequence of a particular gene, called ATG16L1, was associated with response to Humira (adalimumab) treatment in a group of people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a disease in which genetics is known to play a role and newer therapies have had a somewhat mixed response. Humira, with Remicade (infliximab), is an anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNFα) known to be capable of inducing and maintaining remission in certain IBD cases, but "are not effective in 20–40% of IBD patients and loss of response and/or is seen in a substantial proportion of the patients," the researchers wrote. Their study “Genetic polymorphism in ATG16L1 gene is associated with adalimumab use in inflammatory bowel disease,” published in the Journal of Translational Medicine, investigated possible reasons for this, and if findings might support better personalized treatment. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a single natural variation in the DNA, where one nucleotide (building block) is changed. Recent genome-wide studies have identified more than 163 SNPs that associate with IBD. Researchers in Rotterdam evaluated whether the genetic profile of IBD patients, including IBD-associated SNPs, were able to predict patient response to anti-TNFα treatment, such as Remicade and Humira. They analyzed DNA samples from 570 patients at the Erasmus MC University Medical Center: Crohn’s disease was present in 71.9% (411 patients), ulcera
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