Older IBD Patients More Likely to Need Surgery and Given Cortisone Treatments Than Younger Ones, Swedish Study Reports

Older IBD Patients More Likely to Need Surgery and Given Cortisone Treatments Than Younger Ones, Swedish Study Reports
Older adults, age 60 or older, with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Sweden are often treated with cortisone medications instead of newer, immune system-targeting therapies, and they are likely to have more severe disease than previously thought, researchers at the Karolinska Institutet report. Their study “Incidence and Treatment of Patients Diagnosed With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases at 60 Years or Older in Sweden”, was published in the journal Gastroenterology. IBD's onset is usually between 20 and 30 years old, and studies suggest that in rare cases when it appears older adults it usually is less severe . “We therefore sought to ascertain the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease in older age groups and if there is any difference in how they are treated and how they use the healthcare services,” Åsa Hallqvist Everhov, a researcher at institutet’s Department of Clinical Science and Education, and colorectal surgeon at Stockholm South General (Söder) Hospital, said in a press release. The team analyzed data from 27,834 people newly diagnosed with IBD between 2006 and 2014, then divided them21 into three groups depending on their age at disease onset: childhood (younger than 18), adult (18-59) and older adult (60 or older). About one-fifth (23 percent or 6,443 of these patients) were in the oldest age group. Patient data was obtained from the National Board of Health an
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