Strict Dietary Changes Help IBD Patients Achieve Clinical Remission in Small Study

Strict Dietary Changes Help IBD Patients Achieve Clinical Remission in Small Study
Researchers have found that eliminating foods known to stimulate intestinal inflammation — a dietary approach known as the autoimmune protocol diet — improves clinical outcomes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The small study, “Efficacy of the Autoimmune Protocol Diet for Inflammatory Bowel Disease,” was published in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. IBD is a complex disease where the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors influences disease onset and progression. But while researchers have identified approximately 200 genes as risk factors for IBD, their contribution to the disease is limited, accounting for up to 13 percent of Crohn’s disease (CD) and 7 percent of ulcerative colitis (UC) cases. Among environmental factors, diet and the gut microbiome — the collection of natural microbes that populate the intestine — are considered the two major factors to influence disease course. Accumulating evidence suggests that modifications to diet can improve IBD clinical outcomes, but further work is required to identify dietary factors that may be useful in a nutrition-based therapy. The so-called autoimmune protocol (AIP) diet stems from the Paleolithic diet — characterized by consumption of meats, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and the avoidance of dairy products, legumes and grains. As such, “the AIP [autoimmune protocol] diet focuses on an initial elimination phase of food groups including grains, legumes, nightshades, dairy, eggs, coffee, alcohol, nuts and seeds, refined/processed sugars, oils, and food additives,” the authors wrote. This diet's
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.