Cigarette Smoking Led to Colitis Through a T-cell Response in Mice

Cigarette Smoking Led to Colitis Through a T-cell Response in Mice
Researchers have found that cigarette smoking can induce colitis in mice through specific immune cell response. The study “Cigarette Smoking Triggers Colitis by IFN-γ+ CD4+ T Cells,” was published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. Multiple epidemiological and clinical studies have indicated a potential link between cigarette smoking and the development of colitis. In fact, cigarette smoking has been shown to be the strongest risk factor contributing to Crohn’s disease, as the incidence of Crohn’s is much higher in patients with airway diseases. However, despite the prior establishment of a link between cigarette smoke and Crohn’s disease, few laboratory studies have been conducted to determine how cigarette smoking leads to the condition. So, researchers at Kyung Hee University set out to explore the relationship. The cellular immune response is carried by multiple cell types, which includes two types of T-cells known as Th1 and Th17 cells. IFN-γ is a molecule that is expressed by these immune cells and has been shown to play a role in immunity, including autoimmunity. In fact, IFN-γ has been shown to be over-produced in many gastric diseases, including Crohn’s disease. Furthermore, levels of IFN-γ also have been shown to increase after cigarette smoke exposure. That's why researchers hypothesized that cigarette smoke was increasing the risk of Crohn’s disease through expression of IFN-γ. First, researchers demonstrated that cigarette smoke exposure in mice led to the typical characteristics of colitis, including shorter colon length, reduced body weight, infil
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