Fungi and Bacteria Could Be Targeted Together to Treat IBD, Study Suggests

Fungi and Bacteria Could Be Targeted Together to Treat IBD, Study Suggests
Bacteria and fungi appear to work together to exacerbate certain symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease, a new review highlights. The study, "The mycobiome: Role in health and disease, and as a potential probiotic target in gastrointestinal disease," was published in Digestive and Liver Disease. Most studies that have investigated the role of the gut microbiome in relation to IBD have only focused on bacteria, not fungus, overlooking a key organism of the gut. Recently, researchers at Case Western Reserve University showed in a study that there is a positive correlation between levels of pathogenic fungi and bacteria in Crohn's disease. They demonstrated that levels of the bacteria Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, as well as the fungus Candida tropicalisare elevated in Crohn's patients, compared to their healthy relatives without Crohn's. For organisms to survive within a particular physical location such as the gut, members of the microbiome have to work together to create a
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