Crohn’s Disease and the Possibility of Tuberculosis

Crohn’s Disease and the Possibility of Tuberculosis
lisa burks There are numerous treatment options for people suffering from Crohn’s disease. Which medication your doctor prescribes depends on disease severity, but all have known side effects that can manifest and cause problems. The risks for some of these medication groups can be serious. In a previous column, I discussed some of the medications commonly used to manage Crohn’s. These medications break down into groups, one of which is known as biologics. Medications within this category are typically reserved for patients with moderate to severe cases of Crohn’s disease (IBD). Biologics are usually used on patients who failed to be helped by other medications, and are powerful and immune suppressants. This means patients using biologics are more likely to develop infections.

Steps before starting biologics

Before you can start biologics, your doctor will need to preform a few tests. A series of blood work will be drawn, and confirmation that you are up-to-date on immunizations will be needed. The blood work will be used to see how your body will react to certain medications, and to check for underlying infections such as hepatitis and tuberculosis (TB). It is possible to have either of these infections with no symptoms because they can stay dormant, as does, for example, 
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.